71st Season of Public Concerts   2017- 2018

 

Bude Music Society

President : Allan Schiller

 

 

Piatti String Quartet - 22nd October 2017

 The Piatti Quartet gave the opening concert of the Bude Music Society's 71st. season on Sunday 22nd October in St. Martin's Church Killerton Road to a large enthusiastic audience Nathaniel Anderson-Frank - 1st.Violin, Michael Trainor - 2nd violin, Tetsuumi Nagata - Viola and Jessie Ann Richardson - Cello; all young professional Soloists in their own right playing with leading London Orchestras and as a Quartet, winning many prestigious awards, playing on 4, 18th. century instruments. They gave a superb recital in a demanding programme with textures 'as clear as a bell'. It was thrilling to hear 3 major works in a 'live' performance, rather than on CDs. 

instruments. They gave a superb recital in a demanding programme with textures 'as clear as a bell'. It was thrilling to hear 3 major works in a 'live' performance, rather than on CDs. 

 The programme opened with Haydn's 'Bird' quartet, so called because of the numerous 'Bird calls' which were shaped with real delicacy as they passed from player to player, matched by sensitive balance and such lovely phrasing. The ensemble was brilliant, not only in the Haydn but throughout the whole concert, as was the phrasing and subtle rhythmic control. The finale was a real Presto with exciting playing from all the players leading to a wonderfully controlled 'pp' ending.

 The Haydn had been 'led' by Michael Trainor (2nd. Violin); Nathaniel led for the 2 following works - Ravel's wonderful  quartet and the tempestuous C minor quartet by Brahms. The Ravel - criticised by Faure no less, was brilliantly played with wonderful interchanges between the performers and such sensitive dynamics and phrasings, making 'light' of the many complex rhythms and changes of tempi. Particularly memorable were the thrilling pizzicatos, the 'tremulo' bowings and range of both tone and dynamics.

 

 The Brahms C minor quartet concluded this exciting programme and is 'symphonic' in scale and design.  Here again the Piatti Quartet rose to this challenge with each player contributing with real passion,  musical energy and insight. The complex rhythmical changes, control of dynamics and balance were enthralling and memorable throughout. The delicate shading in the 3rd movement contrasted with the dramatic opening of the 'finale' where motifs passed from player to player with complete command.